Institute of World Culture
Theme for 2014

Fostering Freedom and Fellowship in a Changing World

Each year the Institute seeks to more deeply understand and explore one of it aims. The 2014 Program will consider
Aim #10 of the IWC Declaration of Interdependence:

"
To promote universal brotherhood and to foster human fellowship among all races, nations and cultures."

In the pursuit of Aim #10 of the Declaration of Interdependence, the programs of the Institute of World Culture will focus on the theme Fostering Freedom and Fellowship in a Changing World. Freedom is the clarion call expressing the aspirations of many around the world who are demanding change in social, economic and political arrangements. Yet, fellowship is needed to guide and use freedom to nurture cooperative, non-violent means of promoting the welfare of each and all in the emerging global community.

Click here for more information on the IWC Declaration of Interdependence


Program for 2014

Film
Mahatma Gandhi: 20th Century Prophet


Saturday, January 11, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Coordinator: Robert Moore

This film takes you on a vivid and inspiring journey through Gandhi's life and philosophy, focusing on his experiments with satyagraha, defined as soul force or truth force. Film clips made by over 200 cameramen in India, England and South Africa document Gandhi's leadership of historic, non-violent challenges to British imperialism such as the great Salt March. Explanations are offered of self-help movements such as coti or home-spinning which freed India from dependence on British mills. Discussion will follow this inspiring film.
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Forum
Self-Reform and Social Transformation
in Troubled Times: Mohandas Gandhi and Vinoba Bhave

Vinoba Bhave

Saturday, January 25, 2014
2:00 – 4:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: James Tepfer


"A nonviolent revolution is not a program of seizure of power. It is a program of transformation of relationships ending in a peaceful transfer of power." – M.K. Gandhi

This forum will explore the creative ways in which M.K. Gandhi and his devoted disciple, Vinoba Bhave, became exemplary agents of constructive social change during tumultuous times. Forum participants will be encouraged to identify modes of social and political cooperation that make the emergence of a world culture with shared, universal values a viable possibility in the 21st century.
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Seminar
Expanding Participation of Women in the Olympic Games

Saturday, February 8, 2014
2:00 – 4:30 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Gerry Kiffe

The growing influence of women in society over the last 100 years has been mirrored in the expanded participation of women in the Olympic Games. In 1900, for the first time, 22 women out of 997 athletes competed in tennis, golf, croquet, sailing and equestrian competitions. In the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, women will make up 44% of the participating athletes, and the most viewed event is likely to be women’s figure skating. What are the causes of this dramatic change? Is there an impact on society due to these profound changes in Olympic opportunities for women? Exploration of these questions will include video and photographic examples of excellence demonstrated by women in Olympic Games.

For more information, contact Carolyn Dorrance at 967-1055, or carolyn@worldculture.org.
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Film and Discussion
Invictus

Friday, February 21, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Robert Moore

Invictus is Latin for invincible or unconquerable. This film tells the inspiring, true story of how Nelson Mandela partnered with the captain of South Africa's rugby team to help unite their country during a precarious transition. Newly elected President Mandela knew his nation remained racially and economically divided after decades of apartheid. Believing that his people could be brought together through the universal language of sport, Mandela rallied South Africa's rugby team as they make their historic run to the 1995 Rugby World Cup Championship match. In one significant scene, President Mandela discusses with Francois Pienaar, the South African rugby team's captain, what kind of leadership philosophy one needs to use, particularly when faced with a seemingly hopeless, unobtainable task. Leadership by example, Mandela counsels, is needed, along with courage in the face of adversity and perseverance. The dramatic conclusion offers an inspiring illustration of how the values of sport can serve a larger purpose of human and social transformation.  Stellar performances are given by Morgan Freeman (a personal friend of Mandela in real life) and Matt Damon (who consulted with Francois Pienaar). The film is regarded by some as Director Clint Eastwood’s best film.

For more information, contact Carolyn Dorrance at 967-1055, or carolyn@worldculture.org.
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Seminar
The Making of a Mandala

Saturday, March 1, 2014
2:00 – 4:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: The Venerable Lama Losang Samten

Tibetan Lama Losang Samten will offer an illustrated explanation of the meaning and the making of mandalas with a focus on the Kalachakra Mandala that represents the Wheel of Time. This mandala was the first to be created in the United States at a spiritual ceremony in 1981. Since then Lama Samten has participated in the creation of many mandalas throughout the United States and Canada and is often referred to as the “Mandala Man”. The Lama will show how the colors and designs of each mandala have profound meaning originating in the teachings of Guatama Buddha, and maintains a representation of the original teachings over centuries.

For more information, contact Carolyn Dorrance at 967-1055, or carolyn@worldculture.org.
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Forum
Toward a True Kinship of Faiths:
How the World's Religions Can Come Together



Saturday, March 22, 2014
4:00 – 6:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Jonathan Colbert

In this Forum, the core ideas presented by His Holiness, the Dalai Lama in his recent, insightful book, Toward a True Kinship of Faiths: How the World's Religions Can Come Together", will be explored. Admitting that as a young monk, isolated in Tibet, he assumed that his religion, Buddhism was best, this pre-eminent, spiritual leader reviews his personal journey towards understanding and deep respect for many religions. He describes a series of contacts with practitioners of Hinduism, Jainism, Christianity, Islam and Judaism that led him to the realization that while differing in doctrines, all these religions shared the values of love, empathy and compassion. Understanding what religions share leads to true tolerance of them. This tolerance is a necessity for the world-wide growth of human happiness and peaceful coexistence. Even secularists can join in this effort, he suggests. Opportunity for questions and discussion will follow the book review of this inspiring and important text.

For more information, contact Carolyn Dorrance at 967-1055, or carolyn@worldculture.org.
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Forum
Functional Brain Imaging:
What Functional Imaging
Can Reveal About How the Brain Works



Saturday, April 12, 2014
1:00 – 3:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Mark S. Alfano, Ph.D., ABPP(CN,RP), Clinical Neuropsychologist

This forum will discuss what functional brain imaging can reveal about how the brain works. Included in the presentation will be a brief history of how we came to understand brain functioning, followed by a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of current methods of imaging techniques. Examples will be given of what the newer techniques have revealed, especially about changes in the brain as a result of learning and experience. Dr. Mark Alfano has been a practicing neuropsychologist for many years. He is presently working at Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital in Santa Barbara. His primary focus is in the field of brain injury, and he has had a significant amount of clinical experience in the field in addition to his general knowledge and expertise in neuroscience.

For more information, contact Robert Moore at 805-722-0016, or robert@worldculture.org.
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Film and Discussion
The Science of Climate Change
Water, Climate and Society: Challenges in a Rapidly Changing World

Saturday, April 19, 2014
2:00 – 4:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Robert Moore

In preparation for the annual observance of Earth Day, a film of a recent discussion of the science of climate change, held at the University of California, Berkeley, will be shown. Experts will offer an assessment of current scientific knowledge on climate change. They include: Lisa Jackson, Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (2009-2013); Bill Collins, Head, Climate Sciences Department, Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratory and Professor in Earth and Planetary Science, UC Berkeley; and Chris Field, Director, Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology and Professor of Biology and Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University. Opportunity for dialogue will follow the showing of the film.

For more information, contact Robert Moore at 805-722-0016, or robert@worldculture.org.
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Forum
Sindh Studies Anyone?
Or, The Meaning of Cultural Studies in Sindh in the 21st Century:
A View from Post 9/11 Pakistan

Saturday, May 3, 2014
4:00 – 6:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Dr. Ghazala Rahman Rafiq

Dr. Ghazala Rahman Rafiq came to know the Institute of World Culture while doing her graduate studies in education at UC Santa Barbara.  After completing her Ph.D., she returned to her home in Pakistan where she founded the Sindh Abhyas Academy, a regional studies institute established in a private university in Karachi, and where each semester over 50 students get to learn about the Sindhi culture.  One hundred scholars with diverse backgrounds–the classics of Sindh, literature, ethno-musicology, geography, history, and economics, among others–are affiliated, and lecture regularly.

“I wanted to learn more about my own indigenous roots and now
I know I can never delve deeply enough. I am learning about the mystical
poetry that has shaped Sindhi thought, philosophy,
 and psychology for over 300 years.”
      –Ghazala Rahman Rafiq

For more information, contact Carolyn@worldculure.org
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More background information on the Sindh Abhyas Academy

 


Seminar
Myths To Live By

Saturday, May 17, 2014
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Nandini Iyer

In this journey into the ancient uses of mythology to illustrate the challenges and meanings of life, Professor Iyer will explain the philosophical concepts and existential interpretations of several seminal myths. The discussion will include focus on myths about both cosmic and human birth and death, on sources of conflict, remedies of accountability and justice and the possibilities of heroic action. Professor Iyer has taught many courses on comparative mythology.

For more information, contact Carolyn@worldculure.org
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Forum
Henry David Thoreau on Reform
Still in the Mail: Messages from the Imagination

Saturday, May 31, 2014
4:00 – 6:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Joseph Miller

This forum will look to Thoreau's letters to Harrison Blake, and passages from his first book, "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers", with special attention to ideas concerning education and occupation. "Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep," wrote Henry David Thoreau in Walden. Although he claimed never to have "met a man who was quite awake", readers turn to his tight wit and social criticism as a moral alarm clock, and occasionally a rising sun of ecstatic inspiration. Self-reform was the root for lasting or meaningful social reform, and the first order in the exercise of liberty. Likewise, fellowship meant nothing to the solitude-tending Thoreau without vision-nourishing retreats.

For more information, contact Carolyn@worldculure.org
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Click here for selected reading material (Word) (pdf)

 

Seminar
Freedom and Fellowship
in an Artist Community


Monet painting of Giverny garden

Saturday, June 14, 2014
2:00 – 4:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Joyce Johnson

The way artists supported and learned from each other in the movement in France called “New Painting, 1876-1886” will be explained and illustrated in this seminar. Values of both creative freedom and fellowship gave vitality to an artistic community that transformed the aims and styles of painting. Special attention will be given to the impressionists and to the living canvas of Giverny, the home and gardens of Claude Monet.

For more information, contact Carolyn@worldculure.org
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Film
A Midsummer Night's Dream
midsummer's night dream

Saturday, June 21, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

To remind us of the brighter side of summer enchantment, the Institute will celebrate the Summer Solstice with a screening of Shakespeare’s "A Midsummer Night’s Dream". The 1999 rendering of the play by director Michael Hoffman has its limitations, but with a soundtrack of Italian opera combined with a number of stellar performances, a triumphant atmosphere of magic, high romance and merriment is the ultimate result.
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Founding Day Address
American Women as Pioneers in World History


Saturday, July 5, 2014
7:30 – 9:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Carolyn Dorrance

We stand today united in a belief in beauty, genius, and courage, and that these can transform the world.
–Jane Addams 1881

This annual Founding Day Address at the Institute of World Culture will highlight how American Women in the 19th century used the founding ideals of the United States to challenge traditional restrictions on freedom, equality and democracy and to promote a wide range of reforms such as the abolition of slavery, universal suffrage and child labor protections to name a few. To do so they invented new methods of political activism that subsequently inspired thousands of activists using thousands of non-profit organizations to seek change, progress and justice around the globe. Both fearless and creative, these pioneers of reform in the 19th century demonstrated that the definition and meaning of the American Dream is always open to fresh interpretations and ever-evolving applications in diverse societies. Thus, the talk will illustrate how the universal vision behind the American Dream may be renewed by offering a ceaseless source of social, political and personal transformation that no government can destroy.
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Film and Discussion
Paul Robeson: Here I Stand

Paul Robeson

Saturday, July 12, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

This documentary film surveys the life and accomplishments of a remarkable American. Best known for his magnificent voice and inspiring spirituals, Paul Robeson starred in several films, notably a popular favorite Showboat and gave concerts around the world. While his entertainment popularity soared, he became the object of political persecution and black listing. This film reviews his courageous challenge to various racial barriers in mid-20th century America and his demonstration of true civil liberty. In addition to an archival interview with Robeson himself, notables such as Harry Belafonte, William Greaves and Pete Seeger offer their perspective on Robeson’s contribution to American culture and exemplification of citizenship. Suggested donation $3.
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Film and Discussion
Even the Rain
Even the Rain poster

Saturday, July 19, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

An idealistic filmmaker travels to Cochabamba, Bolivia to make a revisionist film about Christopher Columbus’s conquest of the Americas and how the Spanish treated the native peoples. The film crew hires local actors and natives to play extras because of the cheap labor, and then discovers that the film crew is repeating the actions and attitudes of the Spaniards they are criticizing. During the filming, local citizens, including a native actor, are mounting a protest against a multi-national corporation that is taking control of their water supply. (Historically, between 1999 and 2000, the people of Cochabamba, Bolivia, actually waged a successful protest campaign against water privatization.) The question becomes one of whether the protagonists will live up to their convictions. Suggested donation $3.
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Multimedia Presentation
The Way of the Wild: Keystone Species
and the Trophic Cascade

grizzly bear

Saturday, July 26, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenters: Russ Lewin and Gerry Lewin

Recent original photos and video of grizzly bears, gray wolves, raptors, beavers and others will be highlighted to illustrate how nature's delicate balance depends upon keystone species to maintain a healthy tropic cascade. The focus of the presentation will be on the ecosystem of the Greater Yellowstone Area. Come join us for some close-up views of the wild.
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Seminar
Innovative Experiments:
Intentional Communities
and the Guaranteed Annual Income

Saturday, September 6, 2014
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenters: James Tepfer and Maurice Bishell

A fresh review of the principles and practices of intentional communities with contemporary examples will be offered. Particular attention will be paid to how intentional communities can promote both freedom and fellowship. Then proposals for a Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) will be analyzed to see how a creative formulation of the GAI could promote equality for individuals, improve the justice of economic systems and increase the sustainability of resource use. A core question to be addressed is whether 21st century communal experiments and the GAI could become the basis of new modes of socio-economic cooperation and the subsequent birth of multi-dimensional cultures around the world.
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Film
Mulberry Child


Saturday, September 20, 2014
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

When a Chinese immigrant woman finds deep barriers to communication and shared family values with her very Americanized and privileged daughter, she writes an account of her upbringing during the dark years of the Chinese Cultural Revolution in the late 1960’s. The depiction of persecution and survival, particularly of one family, but experienced by millions, awakens the daughter’s sympathies and understanding of her Mother’s feelings. The film illustrates the cross-cultural and deeply rooted tensions in the immigrant experience and teaches the human capacity for courage and endurance.
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Seminar
Mexican Immigration and Generational
Transculturation in American History
Mario Garcia Book Cover, The Latino Generation

Saturday, October 4, 2014
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Professor Mario T. García, UCSB Departments of Chicano Studies and History

Mexican immigration to the United States has a long history and yet it is both old and new. Immigrants from Mexico have been coming to the U.S. in large numbers since the early 20th century and as recently as today. Professor Mario T. García will discuss his extensive research over many years about the characteristics and impact of this immigration process and explain how immigrants and their children have adjusted through a process of transculturation or cultural adaptation to life in the United States. Mexican immigrants and their offspring have been and continue to be an integral part of the American experience and of American history. Professor García will also review the narratives in his new book The Latino Generation: Voices of the New America.
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Film and Discussion
El Norte

Saturday, October 18, 2014
7:00 – 9:30 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

El Norte dramatically depicts the experience of two young, indigenous Guatemalans fleeing from the violent persecutions of the Guatemalan government in the early 1980s. Although Rosa and Enrique, a sister and brother, successfully make their way to Los Angeles through Mexico, it is not without enduring horrific experiences such as the betrayal of their coyote guide. Their struggle to survive in a large, urban city without legal documentation is portrayed with some humorous scenes of cross-cultural communication challenges, but the story is more one of pain and tragedy. The impact of ethnic prejudice, stereotypes and exploitation is persistently portrayed as one type of immigrant experience that tarnishes images of the “American Dream.” Film critic Roger Ebert observed that one of the main characteristics of the film is the way it acknowledges all the political realities of Latin America and yet resists being a "political" film. It tells its story through the eyes of its heroes, and it is one of the rare films that grants Latin Americans full humanity. They are not condescended to, they are not made to symbolize something, they are not glorified, they are simply themselves. El Norte is a 1983 American and British film written and directed by Gregory Nava. It received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay in 1985, the first American independent film to be so honored. In 1995, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
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Seminar
The Immigrant Experience in the United States

cover of Time Magazine photo of immigrants

Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially,
are descended from immigrations and revolutionists.

– Franklin D. Roosevelt

Saturday, October 25, 2014
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

A diverse panel of those who have immigrated to and settled in the United States will share their experience. Discussion will include their perceptions of American culture and lifestyles, contrasts and conflicts with their native cultures, the process of assimilation into American society, work roles, and modes of interpersonal communication and the impact of immigration on children. The benefits and drawbacks of immigration to the United States will be assessed. Questions for the panelists will be encouraged.
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Seminar
Curvatures of Form and Space

London City Hall

Saturday, November 8, 2014
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Kirk Gradin


From the circular temples, domes and amphitheaters of the ancients to the swirling spirals and billowing blooms of the modern masterpiece, architects have used curvilinear forms for both imminently practical and creatively expressive purposes. This multi-media presentation will move 'out of the box' to explore some of the most compelling works of ancient and contemporary architecture employing curvatures of form and space.
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Lecture
The Fourth Paradigm:
Cyberscience and Cyberspace

The Planck mission has imaged the oldest light in our universe, called the cosmic microwave background, with unprecedented precision.

Saturday, November 22, 2014
3:30 – 5:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Russ Lewin

“In Cyberspace we have discovered a new continent.  It is changing how we learn, work and play.    We should launch 21st century Lewis & Clark expeditions to explore it.”  ~  Jim Gray

Effective visualization is a bridge between quantitative information and human intuition.  We are witnessing a co-evolution of humanity, society, culture, science, and technology.   Essentially all of humanity’s activities, science and scholarship included, are migrating into Cyberspace where human minds interact with each other, and with the world of information.    Science in the 21st century is increasingly data-rich and computationally enabled, driven by the evolution of technology.  
The presentation will offer an overview of the first three science paradigms, but focus primarily on the fourth paradigm – data driven mega-science.  We will explore implications and discoveries in the areas of Biotechnology, Climate Science, Physics and Cosmology. In addition, we will use data to view and analyze global trends. We will also seek to understand the implications for individual growth, communication and education.

The presentation will include multiple illustrations and ‘deep data’ visualizations to help all of us enhance our understanding of this new frontier.
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Seminar
Mental Health in a Turbulent World

Face of the Buddha
Saturday, December 6, 2014
2:00 – 4:30 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Eva Moberg

Living in a highly interdependent and volatile world challenges and enriches our lives, but what we see and experience may disturb us deeply. The violent and destructive behavior of some is symptomatic of the silent disorders and dysfunctionality of many. Questions of ethics and responsibility in a global community are mixed with fears of what is foreign or appears threatening to survival. The possibility of true freedom and nurturing fellowship is obscured. Eva Moberg, a therapist who has worked for many years in the Swedish mental health system, will share her observations of contemporary stress and alienation and make recommendations for developing mental health in a turbulent world. Group discussion of why mental health is necessary for both true freedom and fellowship including active participation in global citizenship will be encouraged.
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